Publications by David Stuart-Mogg

Here follows a list of my publications:

Books:

  1. A Guide to Malawi. Blantyre & Cape Town. Central Africana. 1994. ISBN 99908141112. 106pp.
  2. Wansford at the Millennium. The Living Story of an Ancient Village and its’ Community. Stamford. Peter Speigl & Co.  2000.
  3. The Story of Wansford. Stamford. Peter Speigl & Co. 2007.
  4. Mlozi of Central Africa: the End of the Slaver. Foreword by Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, CBE. Blantyre, Malawi & Stamford, UK. Central Africana. 2010. ISBN 978999081425-5.

Book Chapters:

  1. John Nkologo Chilembwe of Nyasaland: Pan African Visionary or Opportunist Revolutionary?  Let Us Die for Africa. Desmond D. Phiri. Central Africana. Blantyre & Cape Town. 1999. ISBN 9990814198. Foreword by Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, CBE. Edited by David Stuart-Mogg.

Articles:

  1. The Kidney Papers. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 48 – No.1, 1995. pp.1-33. With post-script by Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, pp.35-41
  2. The Kidney Papers – A Letter from the Kidney Papers. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 48 – No.1. pp. 42-48.
  3. A Visit to [Colonel] James Njoloma [in Zomba prison]. Malawi Update, Issue 21, March 1997.
  4. A Brief Investigation into the Genealogy of Pastor John Chilembwe of Nyasaland and some Thoughts on the Circumstances Surrounding his Death. The Society of Malawi Journal, Vol. 50 – No.1, 1997. pp. 44-58.
  5. Postscript to “A Brief Investigation into the Genealogy of Pastor John Chilembwe.” The Society of Malawi Journal, Vol. 50 – No: 2. 1997. pp. 54-56.
  6. The Chamare Museum, Mua Mission, Malawi.  African Research and Documentation. No: 75. 1997. pp.1-4. Also REPRINTED: Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No.1, 1999.
  7. Two Unusual Photographs of Fort Mangochi. The Society of Malawi Journal Vol. 51 – No. 1, 1998. pp. 62-70.
  8. A Listing of the British Colonial Forts, Military Encampments and Fortified Bomas in Malawi. Tribute to late Lt. Col. James Njoloma in form of edited extract from latter’s Master’s thesis with a foreword and postscript. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No. 2. 1998. pp.17-26.
  9. The Grave of Joseph Booth. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No. 2. 1998. pp. 33-36.
  10. Two Interesting K.A.R. Shooting Medals & Two N.V.R. Shooting Trophy Spoons. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 52 – No. 2. 1999. pp. 68-71.
  11. Postscript to the Appendix to Desmond D. Phiri’s “Let Us Die For Africa”. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 52 – No. 2. 1999. pp. 72-74.
  12. The Livingstone Stained Glass Windows at Livingstonia. Travel Africa Magazine. Published quarterly. Winter, 2001/2.
  13. Malawi’s Colonial Forts. Travel Africa. Summer, 2002. Re-printed (without authority) The Nation, February 2010.
  14. The Malawi Rifles, the Centenary of the KAR. Malawi First. Vol. 3, No.2, 2002. Blantyre. pp. 55-59.
  15. The Malawi Society Journal. The Herald. Vol. 9 No. 3.  29 July 2002.
  16. The Book of Fancy Fair, Zomba, Nyasaland, 1918. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 56 – No.1. 2003.
  17. Livingstonia Missionary Dr. Jessie Ridge’s 100th Birthday. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 56 – No. 2. 2003. p. 1.
  18. The Rev. David Clement Scott and the Issue of Land Title in British Central Africa. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 57 – No. 2. 2004. pp. 21 – 34.
  19. Miss Gertrude Benham. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 58 – No. 1. 2005.
  20. An African Adventure: Arthur Baring Koe. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 59 – No. 1. 2006. pp. 35 – 43.
  21. Frederick Njilima (Gresham), M.M. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 60 – No. 1. 2007. pp. 23 – 30.
  22. The Identification of John Chilembwe’s Body and his Secret Burial.  Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 61 – No. 2. 2008. pp 42-51.
  23. John Chilembwe: Aspiration and Achievement. With comments by George Shepperson. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 63 – No. 1. 2010. pp 10 – 22.
  24. John Chilembwe’s Wife and Progeny. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 63 – No. 2. 2010. pp. 25 – 38.
  25. Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, C.B.E: Scholar, Soldier, Poet. An appreciation in anticipation of his 90th birthday. Rhino Review. Journal of KAR & EA Forces Association, Vol. II No. 15, 2011.

Book Foreword:

  1. Rosemary Argente. Always With You: a Malawi Legacy. Malawi. Simanyi Books. 2007. ISBN 978 0 9557327 0 6.

Book Reviews:

  1. Corporal Haussmann Goes to War. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol.54 – No.2, 2001.
  2. The Great Rift. David & Elspeth King. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol.55 – No.1, 2002.
  3. Wild Goose: the Life & Death of Hugh van Oppen. Professor Colin Baker. The Herald. 10 July 2002
  4. Malawi: the Warm Heart of Africa. Johnston & Ferrar. Scottish Malawi Update. December 2002.
  5. A Brief History of the Malawi Rifles to Mark the Centenary of the K. A. R. 1902 – 2002. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 56 – No.1. 2003.
  6. A Brief History of the Malawi Rifles to Mark the Centenary of the K. A. R. 1902 – 2002. Lt. Col. Namangale. Zomba. Public information Office. 2002.  Rhino Review. 2003.
  7. Yuraia Chatonda Chirwa: the Faithful Servant. Austin Mkandawire. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 57 – No.1. 2004. p. 45.
  8.  The Spectrum Guide to Malawi. John Douglas & Kelly White. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 57 – No.1. 2004. p. 46
  9.  Peculiar Honours: a Missionary Adventure in Malawi. Rev. Stewart Lane. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 60 – No. 2, 2007.
  10. Jobs for the Boys: the Story of a Family in Britain’s Imperial Heyday. Hew Stevenson. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 63 – No. 2. 2010. pp. 62 -63.

Obituaries:

  1. Captain Arthur Mell, 1925-1998. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No. 2. 1998. pp. 39-43.
  2. Rev. David Brian Roy, 1925-2000. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 52 – No. 2. 1999. pp. 80-83.
  3. Cyril Marlow, M.B.E., P.P.M., 1922-2001. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 55 – No.1, 2002.
  4. Allan Kidney, D. Phil. 1912-2001. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol.55 – No.1, 2002.
  5. Dr. Jessie Christine Ridge, 1903-2006. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 60 – No. 1. 2007. p. 40 – 41.
  6. Colonel Dudley Thornton, CBE, ERD, 1919-2009. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 62 – No 2. 2009. pp. 42 – 44.

Pamphlets:

  1. A History of St. Nicholas Church, Twywell, Northants. PCC. 1995.
  2. The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Wansford, Cambs. PCC. 2001.
  3. St Remigius Church, Water Newton, Cambs. PCC. 2001.

Radio Script:

  1. Deirdre Livingstone’s Journey to Malawi. Narrated by Lord David Steel, KT, KBE, PC.  B.B.C. Radio Scotland. Broadcast 30/12/97.

 

 

 

 

 

Mlozi of Central Africa: Trader, Slaver and Self-styled Sultan

 

Mlozi of Central Africa: The End of the Slaver.

David Stuart-Mogg.

Foreword by Professor George Shepperson, CBE

Central Africana Limited. Blantyre, Malawi & Stamford UK.

pp.xii + 157, 33 illus. ISBN 978 9990814 25-5.

£14.95    (plus postage at cost)

Order direct:   david.stuartmogg@btinternet.com

Settlement by PayPal or Sterling Cheque welcomed

Reviews:

In the story of slavery and empire-building in Central Africa, Mlozi’s life is by no means insignificant. One must, therefore, be very grateful to David Stuart-Mogg for producing this substantial and not unsympathetic study of a complex figure.
Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, CBE. University of Edinburgh.

Well-researched, David Stuart-Mogg’s study of the 19th century slave-trader Mlozi bin Kazbadema is an important contribution to our understanding of the early history of the Nyasaland Protectorate besides offering insights into the motives and actions of such political luminaries as Lugard and Johnston. The study gives a sympathetic portrayal of Mlozi, his relations with the Ngonde and his role within the wider political economy of the region.
Professor Emeritus Brian Morris, University of London.

 Drawing skilfully on a wide range of source material, the author has crafted for us a fascinating, highly readable and copiously illustrated account of an intriguing and important character in the early history of Malawi.
Professor Emeritus Colin Baker, MBE. University of Glamorgan, Wales.

This is a genuinely pioneering work, one from which all students of Malawi’s tangled history can learn.
Professor John McCracken, formerly Professor of History, University of Malawi; Past President, African Studies Association, UK.

‘This biography of the man we know as “Mlozi” must be the first book for more than a hundred years on the “Arab War” and its aftermath.  Drawing on oral, archival and published sources it is clearly written, and well illustrated, and sheds new light on an intriguing story. The cast of characters includes Mlozi himself and his Swahili-speaking collaborators and competitors, as well as the representatives of the African Lakes Company and a motley band of volunteers and mercenaries, including Frederick Lugard, later a great African proconsul and peer of the realm, and Alfred Sharpe, later governor of Nyasaland. And then there is the controversial and impetuous Sir Harry Johnston…they all make for a good read.’

Professor Hugh Macmillan, formerly Professor of History, University of Transkei, South Africa, who has also taught at universities in Zambia and Swaziland.

The British liked to promote a historical myth that their acquisition of Central African territories like Northern Rhodesia (Zambia) and Nyasaland (Malawi) occurred as part of a competition between empires. David Stuart-Mogg…set out to try to redress the balance against a purely British viewpoint of the nature of the conflict with Mlozi and his compatriots and also to attempt to find out some of the lingering attitudes to this figure from among his African enemies, including the people among whom he settled, and from his descendants, insofar as they could be identified.

Professor John M. MacKenzie. African Research & Documentation. pp.41/42. No. 113, 2010

David Stuart-Mogg’s book is a challenging, fascinating, multi-layered work examining a dark period in Malawi’s history using the story of the ivory and slave trader Mlozi.

Dr. John Lwanda, MB, ChB, FRCP, PhD. Writer and Social Historian

This is…written with the precision of the surgeon’s knife about the events surrounding the horrors of slavery – one of Africa’s darkest periods. The work is exceptional in its research and quality of writing and comes from a noteworthy historian with a keen analytical mind.

John Catton (editor), Rhino Link: the Journal of the King’s African Rifles & East African Forces Association. Vol. II, No. 14, 2011