Publications by David Stuart-Mogg

Here follows a list of my publications:

Books:

  1. A Guide to Malawi. Blantyre & Cape Town. Central Africana. 1994. ISBN 99908141112. 106pp.
  2. Wansford at the Millennium. The Living Story of an Ancient Village and its’ Community. Stamford. Peter Speigl & Co.  2000.
  3. The Story of Wansford. Stamford. Peter Speigl & Co. 2007.
  4. Mlozi of Central Africa: the End of the Slaver. Foreword by Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, CBE. Blantyre, Malawi & Stamford, UK. Central Africana. 2010. ISBN 978999081425-5.

Book Chapters:

  1. John Nkologo Chilembwe of Nyasaland: Pan African Visionary or Opportunist Revolutionary?  Let Us Die for Africa. Desmond D. Phiri. Central Africana. Blantyre & Cape Town. 1999. ISBN 9990814198. Foreword by Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, CBE. Edited by David Stuart-Mogg.

Articles:

  1. The Kidney Papers. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 48 – No.1, 1995. pp.1-33. With post-script by Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, pp.35-41
  2. The Kidney Papers – A Letter from the Kidney Papers. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 48 – No.1. pp. 42-48.
  3. A Visit to [Colonel] James Njoloma [in Zomba prison]. Malawi Update, Issue 21, March 1997.
  4. A Brief Investigation into the Genealogy of Pastor John Chilembwe of Nyasaland and some Thoughts on the Circumstances Surrounding his Death. The Society of Malawi Journal, Vol. 50 – No.1, 1997. pp. 44-58.
  5. Postscript to “A Brief Investigation into the Genealogy of Pastor John Chilembwe.” The Society of Malawi Journal, Vol. 50 – No: 2. 1997. pp. 54-56.
  6. The Chamare Museum, Mua Mission, Malawi.  African Research and Documentation. No: 75. 1997. pp.1-4. Also REPRINTED: Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No.1, 1999.
  7. Two Unusual Photographs of Fort Mangochi. The Society of Malawi Journal Vol. 51 – No. 1, 1998. pp. 62-70.
  8. A Listing of the British Colonial Forts, Military Encampments and Fortified Bomas in Malawi. Tribute to late Lt. Col. James Njoloma in form of edited extract from latter’s Master’s thesis with a foreword and postscript. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No. 2. 1998. pp.17-26.
  9. The Grave of Joseph Booth. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No. 2. 1998. pp. 33-36.
  10. Two Interesting K.A.R. Shooting Medals & Two N.V.R. Shooting Trophy Spoons. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 52 – No. 2. 1999. pp. 68-71.
  11. Postscript to the Appendix to Desmond D. Phiri’s “Let Us Die For Africa”. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 52 – No. 2. 1999. pp. 72-74.
  12. The Livingstone Stained Glass Windows at Livingstonia. Travel Africa Magazine. Published quarterly. Winter, 2001/2.
  13. Malawi’s Colonial Forts. Travel Africa. Summer, 2002. Re-printed (without authority) The Nation, February 2010.
  14. The Malawi Rifles, the Centenary of the KAR. Malawi First. Vol. 3, No.2, 2002. Blantyre. pp. 55-59.
  15. The Malawi Society Journal. The Herald. Vol. 9 No. 3.  29 July 2002.
  16. The Book of Fancy Fair, Zomba, Nyasaland, 1918. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 56 – No.1. 2003.
  17. Livingstonia Missionary Dr. Jessie Ridge’s 100th Birthday. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 56 – No. 2. 2003. p. 1.
  18. The Rev. David Clement Scott and the Issue of Land Title in British Central Africa. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 57 – No. 2. 2004. pp. 21 – 34.
  19. Miss Gertrude Benham. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 58 – No. 1. 2005.
  20. An African Adventure: Arthur Baring Koe. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 59 – No. 1. 2006. pp. 35 – 43.
  21. Frederick Njilima (Gresham), M.M. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 60 – No. 1. 2007. pp. 23 – 30.
  22. The Identification of John Chilembwe’s Body and his Secret Burial.  Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 61 – No. 2. 2008. pp 42-51.
  23. John Chilembwe: Aspiration and Achievement. With comments by George Shepperson. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 63 – No. 1. 2010. pp 10 – 22.
  24. John Chilembwe’s Wife and Progeny. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 63 – No. 2. 2010. pp. 25 – 38.
  25. Professor Emeritus George Shepperson, C.B.E: Scholar, Soldier, Poet. An appreciation in anticipation of his 90th birthday. Rhino Review. Journal of KAR & EA Forces Association, Vol. II No. 15, 2011.

Book Foreword:

  1. Rosemary Argente. Always With You: a Malawi Legacy. Malawi. Simanyi Books. 2007. ISBN 978 0 9557327 0 6.

Book Reviews:

  1. Corporal Haussmann Goes to War. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol.54 – No.2, 2001.
  2. The Great Rift. David & Elspeth King. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol.55 – No.1, 2002.
  3. Wild Goose: the Life & Death of Hugh van Oppen. Professor Colin Baker. The Herald. 10 July 2002
  4. Malawi: the Warm Heart of Africa. Johnston & Ferrar. Scottish Malawi Update. December 2002.
  5. A Brief History of the Malawi Rifles to Mark the Centenary of the K. A. R. 1902 – 2002. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 56 – No.1. 2003.
  6. A Brief History of the Malawi Rifles to Mark the Centenary of the K. A. R. 1902 – 2002. Lt. Col. Namangale. Zomba. Public information Office. 2002.  Rhino Review. 2003.
  7. Yuraia Chatonda Chirwa: the Faithful Servant. Austin Mkandawire. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 57 – No.1. 2004. p. 45.
  8.  The Spectrum Guide to Malawi. John Douglas & Kelly White. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 57 – No.1. 2004. p. 46
  9.  Peculiar Honours: a Missionary Adventure in Malawi. Rev. Stewart Lane. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 60 – No. 2, 2007.
  10. Jobs for the Boys: the Story of a Family in Britain’s Imperial Heyday. Hew Stevenson. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 63 – No. 2. 2010. pp. 62 -63.

Obituaries:

  1. Captain Arthur Mell, 1925-1998. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 51 – No. 2. 1998. pp. 39-43.
  2. Rev. David Brian Roy, 1925-2000. The Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 52 – No. 2. 1999. pp. 80-83.
  3. Cyril Marlow, M.B.E., P.P.M., 1922-2001. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 55 – No.1, 2002.
  4. Allan Kidney, D. Phil. 1912-2001. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol.55 – No.1, 2002.
  5. Dr. Jessie Christine Ridge, 1903-2006. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 60 – No. 1. 2007. p. 40 – 41.
  6. Colonel Dudley Thornton, CBE, ERD, 1919-2009. Society of Malawi Journal. Vol. 62 – No 2. 2009. pp. 42 – 44.

Pamphlets:

  1. A History of St. Nicholas Church, Twywell, Northants. PCC. 1995.
  2. The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Wansford, Cambs. PCC. 2001.
  3. St Remigius Church, Water Newton, Cambs. PCC. 2001.

Radio Script:

  1. Deirdre Livingstone’s Journey to Malawi. Narrated by Lord David Steel, KT, KBE, PC.  B.B.C. Radio Scotland. Broadcast 30/12/97.

 

 

 

 

 

The Story of Wansford

The Story of Wansford

Foreword

This is the story of Wansford, described by its own villagers and friends from neighbouring communities. Such a venture is indicative of the continuing community spirit that was once widespread amongst adjacent rural settlements. Notwithstanding the significant increase in new housing in Wansford and the conversion of properties from agriculturally related or commercial use into domestic dwellings, the village has happily largely retained a spirit of common interest that was shared amongst the majority of country people in past centuries. Such people often lived barely above subsistence level, yet prided themselves in their necessary rugged individuality and ability to survive the seasonal vagaries of a largely agrarian based economy. Today’s Wansford resident is most likely to have forsaken the stress and pollution of an urban environment by choice. The attractions of family life, or indeed retirement, enjoying reasonably unpolluted country air within a relatively low-density and largely crime-free environment, adjacent to fields and woodlands, are abundantly clear. Not that life in any village at the start of the twenty-first century should be painted as one of uninterrupted bucolic bliss. Increasingly, villages everywhere are threatened with the prospect of becoming mere dormitories for commuters who work, shop and often socialise away from their village. This potential is arguably encouraged by so-called ‘brown-field development’, where gardens are lost to new housing and properties demolished for profitable rebuilds at higher density levels; often at the cost of irreparable damage to long-term village ambiance. More cars, more motor mowers, more hedge trimmers, more power-washers, more bonfires, more fireworks – all at ever closer proximity and at greater frequency – thereby detracting from the very quality of life that has hitherto been a keynote attraction of villages and rural life everywhere. Clearly, Wansford must evolve and grow if it is to survive. However, such growth must surely be both sensitive and organic. In the wake of continuing losses of amenity, all manner of local enterprises come under threat as Wansford and surrounding villages gradually morph into little more than suburbs of Peterborough – perhaps eventually with their own Tesco Metro supplanting the traditional village post office and stores! That said, Wansford is indeed fortunate in still having a community that welcomes, indeed embraces the new whilst, on occasion at least, minding a duty of care as custodian of the past.
Welcome to the story of Wansford – and part of Stibbington.

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